Education

For relocating families, finding a school with the programs and services that fit the needs of the children is often a deciding factor in choosing a new neighbourhood. Be sure to educate yourself.


Colleges

Algonquin College of Applied Arts and Technology algonquincollege.com
1385 Woodroffe Ave. Nepean, ON K2G 1V8 (613) 722-9999

Public Schools & Boards

Top of the Class - Tim Lougheed and Elizabeth Howell

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Is your child an arts aficionado? Do you want him or her to learn French, or another language besides English? To take an accelerated program to get credit in university?

Ottawa being such a hub for government and industry, educational options abound and all those needs can be easily fulfilled. Seven school boards and 400 elementary and secondary schools crowd the region, so finding a school is not a struggle; the work instead should go into which
one is best for your child.

Most parts of Ontario have two distinct boards of education: the Public and the Separate, or Catholic, school systems. Ottawa-Gatineau offers these options as well,but you also have the choice of more
specialized schooling.

When looking for a place to live, be sure to check which boards serve the district. If you want to send your child to a school outside the district, you may have to apply well in advance.

Deadlines are critical for language immersion programs or private schools. For some schools, the application process can begin almost a year before the September your child can attend. So contact the organization responsible for the institution that interests you. Ask
when to apply for a cross-boundary transfer, French immersion, or kindergarten registration for your child.

It’s best to check not only with the school board, but also with principals and current students and their parents. Visit the school’s website or tour the school with your kids. You’ll learn about the school’s average test scores,attendance rates, homework policies, teacher-student ratios, anti-bullying policy, extracurricular activities, and special
services or programs your child might benefit from.
 
Also examine transportation options to the school. Students who live far away from a school usually can depend on the yellow school buses, but there are exceptions. If you live outside the school’s district, you’re often expected to provide your own transportation. Some schools offer discounts on the public-transportation system, OC Transpo, instead f yellow bus service. Check
with the school board you’re interested in for more details.

On the Ontario side of the river, you may consider one of four major school boards: the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board, which provides English public education; the Ottawa-Carleton Catholic School Board, which serves English-speaking Catholics; and the Conseil des écoles publiques de l’Est de Ontario and Conseil des écoles catholiques de langue française du Centre-Est, which each educate non-Catholic and Catholic
children of French heritage.

On the Quebec side, choices include: the Western Quebec School Board,responsible for English language schooling in the region; the Commission scolaire des Draveurs, which manages French-language schools in Gatineau; and the Commission scolaire des Portages-de-l’Outaouais, which manages French-language schools in outlying areas. Note that under Quebec’s Charter of the French Language (Bill 101), children require special dispensation to receive schooling in English. Eligibility details can
be found at www.mels.gouv.qc.ca/daasa/rens/banque/Fiches/F95a.htm.

If private school appeals to you, check out the Ottawa-based Ontario Federation of Independent Schools for a listing and background information on each one. Again, ask other parents for references. As with any school you choose outside your neighbourhood district, you will likely have to provide your own transportation, so examine transit and car-pooling options.

To register your children, you will usually need their birth certifi cates and proof of standard immunizations. For specifics, contact the board’s office. MTO

Ottawa-Carleton Catholic School Board www.occdsb.on.ca
Ottawa

Universities

Carleton University www.carleton.ca
Saint-Paul University www.ustpaul.uottawa.ca
Universite du Quebec en Outaoais www.uqo.ca
University of Ottawa www.uottawa.ca
Public Schools & Boards
Top of the Class

-Tim Lougheed and Elizabeth Howell

Is your child an arts aficionado? Do you want him or her to learn French, or another language besides English? To take an accelerated program to get credit in university?

Ottawa being such a hub for government and industry, educational options abound and all those needs can be easily fulfilled. Seven school boards and 400 elementary and secondary schools crowd the region, so finding a school is not a struggle; the work instead should go into which
one is best for your child.

Most parts of Ontario have two distinct boards of education: the Public and the Separate, or Catholic, school systems. Ottawa-Gatineau offers these options as well,but you also have the choice of more
specialized schooling.

When looking for a place to live, be sure to check which boards serve the district. If you want to send your child to a school outside the district, you may have to apply well in advance.

Deadlines are critical for language immersion programs or private schools. For some schools, the application process can begin almost a year before the September your child can attend. So contact the organization responsible for the institution that interests you. Ask
when to apply for a cross-boundary transfer, French immersion, or kindergarten registration for your child.

It’s best to check not only with the school board, but also with principals and current students and their parents. Visit the school’s website or tour the school with your kids. You’ll learn about the school’s average test scores,attendance rates, homework policies, teacher-student ratios, anti-bullying policy, extracurricular activities, and special
services or programs your child might benefit from.
 
Also examine transportation options to the school. Students who live far away from a school usually can depend on the yellow school buses, but there are exceptions. If you live outside the school’s district, you’re often expected to provide your own transportation. Some schools offer discounts on the public-transportation system, OC Transpo, instead f yellow bus service. Check
with the school board you’re interested in for more details.

On the Ontario side of the river, you may consider one of four major school boards: the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board, which provides English public education; the Ottawa-Carleton Catholic School Board, which serves English-speaking Catholics; and the Conseil des écoles publiques de l’Est de Ontario and Conseil des écoles catholiques de langue française du Centre-Est, which each educate non-Catholic and Catholic
children of French heritage.

On the Quebec side, choices include: the Western Quebec School Board,responsible for English language schooling in the region; the Commission scolaire des Draveurs, which manages French-language schools in Gatineau; and the Commission scolaire des Portages-de-l’Outaouais, which manages French-language schools in outlying areas. Note that under Quebec’s Charter of the French Language (Bill 101), children require special dispensation to receive schooling in English. Eligibility details can
be found at www.mels.gouv.qc.ca/daasa/rens/banque/Fiches/F95a.htm.

If private school appeals to you, check out the Ottawa-based Ontario Federation of Independent Schools for a listing and background information on each one. Again, ask other parents for references. As with any school you choose outside your neighbourhood district, you will likely have to provide your own transportation, so examine transit and car-pooling options.

To register your children, you will usually need their birth certifi cates and proof of standard immunizations. For specifics, contact the board’s office. MTO